Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN2 8
CSPAN 6
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
% american. his anger growing up was the catholic church. being irish catholic in boston, he needed an anchor. he was born in east boston is a kind of local royalty. everybody knew his mother's family and his father's family. his father was a prominent politician and very well respected, very well admired. a very successful businessman. joseph kennedy went to boston. he was a star. he met with the prettiest girl in boston who also happen to be the mayor's daughter. she would later marry. there is a story of the baseball team, he was class president when he went to harvard, and again, he felt part of the community. half of his class when with him to harvard and it was only when he graduated in 1912 that he understood, for the first time and not for the last what it meant to be the irish catholic son of an east boston politician. he wanted to go into banking and finance. he didn't do the job. he didn't get a job offer. he didn't get an interview. all of his friends and classmates, some of who were not as good with numbers as he was, none of who were as articulate or charming or handsome as he w
to boston to watch the returns in a speech to supporters. we have been speaking to reporters the last couple of days here at c-span, finding out what they think is going to happen on election night. >> we're going to see a pretty consistent pattern across the country. it will start in virginia where the polls closed at 7:00 p.m. burgeon as a contested battleground state. a relatively tight race. the bottom line, it will be a close race. they're good at counting votes and we have a pretty good senate race. if we know that virginia is leaning one way or another, or toward one of the senate candidate, we're going to have a pretty good idea of what the rest of the night is good to look for. keep an eye on virginia. that is an early bellwether, canary in the coal mine for what is coming the rest of the night. in a macro sense what i am looking at is -- what we will see on november 6 is the first normal data point we have seen in eight years. we have not seen what a normal life threat looks like since george of the bush was running for reelection. we will watch how many non-white voter turnout. is
in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pakistani state is quite helpful with the operational commander of 9/11. we have had pakistani help reticular
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
was awarded to general george washington in 1776 for liberating the city of boston. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to aung san suu kyi in recognition of her efforts to liberate the people of burma. today, we celebrate her steadfast commitment to democracy, stability, and human dignity, and we do so in a manner worthy of her ideals. nancy pelosi initiated the measure of awarding this metal and republican george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by th
's the front page of the boston globe this morning -- clinton was dispatched by president obama to israel and is meeting today with egyptian officials and palestinian officials as well. the headline from the tribune -- late tuesday night clinton met with benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem and plans to go to the west bank on wednesday. clinton is preparing to step down early next year. one story this morning, some breaking news from jerusalem. this is according to a dap. really rescue services said there have been explosions on a bus across the military headquarters in tel aviv. the agency says at least 10 people were injured in wednesday's blast. the explosion comes amid an ongoing israeli operation rollers.aza's hamas so, more information on that incident probably coming later today. but we are taking your calls this morning on your confidence in the economy, your thoughts on the fiscal cliff, and how you are preparing for that. marc is from 0 highfill on our independent line. -- from ohio. caller: good morning. i'm a person who believes we need to do something radical, which a lot of peopl
to play the role of leader of the republican party. the boston globe reported that mr. romney is likely to move to la jolla, california, to spend more time with his car, presumably. but in his short time as leader of the republican party, when he was their presidential nominee, he made leadership decisions about the party. about what the party's like. about what the party looks like to the rest of the country. he made leadership decisions particularly in terms of who he would dignify with his embrace. who among everybody in the republican party, he, mitt romney, leader of the party, would privilege. who he would elevate. he elevated guys like chris cobach. the republican guy who wrote arizona's papers please immigration law. he was mitt romney's immigration adviser. he made and then kept as his national campaign chairman a man named john sununu who called president obama lazy and not very bright and said president obama needs to, quote, learn how to be an american. mitt romney's national campaign chairman. mr. romney also elevated and dignified by his presence, i'm sorry to have to say
in the "washington post," "the boston globe," slate, the beirut daily star, san francisco magazine, "mother jones," and many, many others. eventually mr. jim and document a spectator and the daily car will be joining us and when he does i will give him a proper introduction. would the gentleman i have a right now i think a good way to get started, so those are three different perspectives, too represented here now, these are for philosophies in the midst of a campaign season, we are left and right and whatever is in between but i suppose that might be libertarian, dictator or influence on this election are outlined the american body politic. i think we should start with you individuals describing what it means to be a liberal. we will start with mr. scher. >> thanks very much for doing this. thank you for having us here. i've always defined liberalism very simply. the three r.'s of government. a government that is representative of all the people, that is responsive to the peoples concerned and is responsible of managing our resources both financial and natural. and that to me is the kind of gove
through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose middle name is hussein and got himself elected of the united states probably didn't become a political on january 20, 2009, but he did this unbelievably unpopular stimulus. then he didn't even more on popular auto bailout. he didn't even more unpopular health care reform. meanwhile he's doing his controversial things in iraq, doing stuff in and, getting us into libya, and making statements about marriage. there's financial
is in chicago, and mitt romney in boston. we'll focus on the more competitive senate seats and taking reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter with live coverage beginning at eight eastern on c-span c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> when i watch c-span, i like the morning journal, the give and take there, the balanced approach, and i also like to hear the callers. never called myself, but i like hearing the callers. some of them are unusual to say the least, others thought provoking. c-span is everywhere. in washington, every event, you know, small hearings, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watching c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> up next, former presidential candidate ralph nader on his book "17 solutions: bold ideas for america's future" looking at the political and cosh -- landscape and issues facing the country. the independent candidate for president in 2004 and 2008 discusses tax reform, the reduction of the
staff certainly said one thing but in boston at the romney headquarters my god was sensing a lot of confidence coming out of that building. unlike mr. romney and did have a concession speech prepared for this event as we thought through what the conversation would be like depending on the scenario but i had a few questions on election night. the first was remembering exactly what it felt like in 2004, where we had a dozen constitutional amendments passed all across the country. you had karl rove celebrated as the architect hewitt just built a new kind of republican electoral majority that would have legs in traction for a decade or two. you had a president who was reelected, not because of that within the toolkit was the use of the wedge issue, gay, gays and lgbt couples across the country. the dark and sort of fetal position and what i sensed on election night this year is how proud i am about our resilience. we picked ourselves up and we decided to fight and decided to start talking to republicans. we decided to demand more from our great democratic front. a lot of movements co
with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus king, who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. dr. fred barnes, the executive editor of the weekly standard will take your questions about the election. we will discuss the vote with the national association of latino elected and appointed officials. and the washington bureau chief with the loss angeles times will look at demographic changes in the electorate. live on c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. congress returns to washington d.c. next week for a lam
wednesday afternoon in boston. he and ann romney both thanking the staff at large for their service and for giving up so much of their lives. i can also tell you, in conversation with romney aides in the last few hours, he's been helping some of those staffers find new jobs. >> tell me about what happened with the credit cards. i heard from you or read somewhere there was a bit of a rude awakening just a few hours after the campaign ended. >> right. just another example of how quickly these campaigns, which take so lock to ramp up, start to shut down. a number of romney aides told me on wednesday in the wee hours of the morning, a lot of these folks staying late to clean up and tear down the set, just even getting out of their cabs on their way back home early wednesday morning found their romney campaign credit cards had been shut off. i tried to call a staffer in florida on wednesday and her cell phone had already been shut down and disconnected. these things wind down extremely quickly. >> it was a campaign that was trumpeting fiscal conservatism. if you're fiscally conservative,
. but then as they started getting the information into orca, this data mining thing that they had going in boston, it was way off. >> brian: i've always said don't trust models. >> gretchen: we've gone from domino to heating studios to orca? >> steve: it's the name of their computer. they started noticing embossed with orca on election day that while their turnout was good, the other side's turnout was much better. that is why they lost the election. >> gretchen: let's do some other headlines for you now for tuesday. you probably seen his name hundreds of times on your computer screen. but the founder of the world's most famous antivirus company, john mcafee wanted for murder. police in belize want to question him about the shooting death his neighbor. the two had been at odds after fall filed a complaint against mcafe, for firing guns. it's said he was arrested on gun charges. >>> he wanted to blow up the home of former president george w. bush. in a few hours, he could be locked up for the rest of his life. a judge will sentence the saudi man in a texas courtroom today. a jury convicted him in
on this gragraduate degree, he is workig at a domestic violence shelter in boston. harvard awarded him the thomas upton scholarship. pierre recently wrote an article about growing up as undocumented immigrant and here what is he said. "i am not a criminal, a monito , a predator, or swung had sits at someone doing nothing meaningful. i care for this country, as well as its sorrows and joys. i am not asking that our government maintain an open-door policy for immigrants. i am simply asking that it give an opportunity to those of us who have proven ourselves." well, pierre is right. america needs young people just like him who love their country and are dedicated to caring for our society's most vulnerable. so what do the american people think about the idea of the dream act? a bloomberg poll found that 64% of likely voters, almost two out of three, including 66% of independents support the policy compared to only 30% who oppose it. by a margin of 2-1 the american people know this is the right thing to do. now we need to pass a comprehensive immigration reform. on our side the negotiating effort wil
kind of, you know, making that commute to boston area and moving from out of state in might have something to do with that swing. >> sure it does. brian, thanks very much. we'll watch new hampshire and the four electoral votes. >> our next battleground stop is colorado with its nine electoral votes. just like ohio, went for barack obama in 2008 after helping george w. bush win the white house in 2004. cnn's kung la is in colorado. are you getting a sense of who has the upper hand? >> reporter: well, the republicans saying they have the upper hand looking at who's actually voted, cast that vote, the republicans are leading by about 25,000 votes but that's not very much of a gap. what we're seeing here in this location i'm standing in, the early voting as you mentioned, kate, is over. but what people are doing is dropping off early ballots. they're -- these are the mail-in ballots. they can drop them off and murphy's law, no one's here but they can drive up, give their ballot to this gentleman and then he'll take the ballot and drop it in this red box. from here, these ballots then
's boston journal, andrew grossman on hurricane sandy release of federal spending. after that, founder and executive editor of the report on the future of the farm bill. the last farm bill expired in september. plus e-mails, phone calls. live on c-span. former abc news reporter and anger ted koppel talks about network news -- and anchor ted koppel talks about network news. hosta by harvard and george washington university. >> from the national press club in washington, d.c. >> hello and welcome to the national press club. i am marvin kalb. the conversation with ted koppel about democracy and the press. if i use the word twilight to suggest that network news, as we have known it, is on its way out and as something new is emerging. whether what is new will satisfy the urgent needs of our democracy cannot be noted at this time. let's hope that it will. without a free and occasionally rambunctious media, we will not be living in an open society. the free press and an open society are intimately linked, one dependent on the other. network news -- if network news is in its twilight, then per
of college and got a job in my home town of boston at a telephone -- television station. they needed somebody to sweep the floors and i grabbed it right away. i was the lowest form of life and the television station. they were giving the last slice of cake to my cameraman's dog before me. i think that is important in a couple of ways. you get to do everything. when i was doing the low-level job, i was able to observe everything. i was able to watch everything. i think humility is a big part of the news business. we are just reporters. it is another thing that it's anotherin our world as the star system. anger people have become stars. that is and congress with just regular reporters. -- anchor people have become stars. you might be less than you think you are going to be at some point, that is actually a good thing. but the yourself in terms of being able to learn everything you can around the. i was watching because they had a radio station. i got to work for them and write to their copy for free in my spare time. my job was enough to pay the rent. my first editorial job, i did not get paid
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)